In The Round with Marshall Chapman, Matraca Berg, Will Kimbrough and Tommy Womack, $20

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In The Round with Marshall Chapman, Matraca Berg, Will Kimbrough and Tommy Womack, $20
Saturday, November 30, 2019 9:30 PM
The Bluebird Cafe, Nashville, TN
  • $20 cover charge at door
  • $10 food/drink minimum per person
 
Admission Type Price Quantity
Ticket Sales start on 11/25/2019 08:00 AM
Show Details
  • When: Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 9:30 PM (Doors open at 9:00 PM)
  • Ticket Price: $0.00
  • Door Time: 9:00 PM
  • Show Type: Singer / Songwriter
  • Restrictions: $20 cover charge at door
    $10 food/drink minimum per person
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There are 20 tables, 10 bar seats and 8 pew seats available for reservation. The remaining pew seats for this show are not reserved in advance. These seats are available on a first come/first served basis when doors open.
Marshall Chapman: Marshall Chapman is an American singer-songwriter-author who was born and raised in Spartanburg, South Carolina. To date she has released thirteen critically acclaimed albums. Her latest, Blaze of Glory, was hailed a masterpiece. Chapman’s songs have been recorded by everyone from Emmylou Harris and Joe Cocker to Irma Thomas and Jimmy Buffett. 

In 2010, Chapman landed her first movie role, playing Gwyneth Paltrow’s road manager in Country Strong. During filming, her musical Good Ol’ Girls (adapted from the fiction of Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle, featuring songs by Matraca Berg and Marshall) opened off-Broadway. That fall, Chapman simultaneously released a book (They Came to Nashville) and CD (Big Lonesome). They Came to Nashville was nominated for the 2011 SIBA Book Award for nonfiction, and the Philadelphia Inquirer named Big Lonesome “Best Country/Roots Album of 2010.”

Of her three rockin’ albums for Epic, the Al Kooper-produced Jaded Virgin was voted Record of the Year (1978) by Stereo Review. Her album, It’s About Time… (Island, 1995), recorded live at the Tennessee State Prison for Women, drew rave reviews from Time, USA Today and the Village Voice.
Chapman’s first book, Goodbye, Little Rock and Roller (St. Martin’s Press) was a SIBA bestseller, 2004 SIBA Book Award finalist, and one of three finalists for the Southern Book Critics Circle Award. The book is now in its third printing.

Since Country Strong, Chapman continues to land film roles. In Mississippi Grind (2015) she plays the blues-singing mother of a drifter-gambler played by Ryan Reynolds. In Lovesong, which opened to rave reviews at 2016 Sundance Film Festival, she plays the mother of the groom (Ryan Eggold) opposite Rosanna Arquette’s mother of the bride. Most recently, in Novitiate, which opened to rave reviews at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, she plays a nun who loses her mind.

Marshall is a contributing editor to Garden & Gun and Nashville Arts Magazine. She’s also written for The Oxford American, Southern Living, WPerforming Songwriter, and The Bob Edwards Show (Sirius/XM). “But music,” she says, “is my first and last love.” Marshall is currently featured in “Outlaws & Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s” — an exhibit that opened May 25, 2018, at the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum in Nashville. The exhibit will run until Feb. 14, 2021.
Matraca Berg: Matraca Berg had her first No. 1 record as a songwriter at age 18. That, in turn, has qualified her to become one of the youngest Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame nominees in history: To be eligible, a writer must have first achieved prominence at least 25 years ago. She was inducted in October 2008. 

That first hit was “Faking Love,” as sung by T.G. Sheppard and Karen Brooks. In the years since, Berg’s songs have practically become the soundtrack of contemporary Nashville. Reba McEntire’s “The Last One to Know” (1987), Patty Loveless’ “I’m That Kind of Girl”(1991), Trisha Yearwood’s “Wrong Side of Memphis” (1992), Martina McBride’s “Wild Angels “(1996), the Dixie Chicks’ “If I Fall You’re Going Down With Me” (2001) and more than 50 other recordings of her songs have made her one of the most recorded composers in Music City. 

Matraca’s songs have been sung by Randy Travis, Faith Hill, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Linda Ronstadt, Tanya Tucker, Pam Tillis, Keith Urban, Dusty Springfield, Clint Black, Loretta Lynn and dozens of others. Her cowritten “Strawberry Wine,” as performed by Deana Carter, was named the Country Music Association’s Song of the Year in 1997. As if to top it all off, Gretchen Wilson’s recording of Matraca’s and Jim Collins’ “I Don’t Feel Like Loving You Today” received a 2007 Grammy nomination for Best Country Song. 

In addition, the songwriter issued three CDs in 1990-97, plus a 1999 compilation, that have brought her wide acclaim as a performer. She and fellow Nashville songwriter Marshall Chapman provided the songs for the 2000 theatrical production Good Ol’ Girls, which continues to be staged by regional repertory companies. As a backup vocalist she has recorded with Kris Kristofferson, Neil Young and many others. She appeared in the 1987 motion picture Made In Heaven and on the soundtrack of 1993’s The Thing Called Love. And in 2004, she added “producer” to her list of accomplishments by guiding the disc debut of Sony newcomer Christy Sutherland. 

“Making records has done more for my career than anything, I think,” says Matraca. “It raised my profile as a writer like nothing else. It was because of my records that Trisha and Martina and Faith and everyone recorded my songs
Will Kimbrough: It’s good to be Will Kimbrough (if you can stand the hours). He’s respected  — make that revered — as a guitarist, as a producer, as a touring singer-songwriter, and here he is, in 2019, an Americana artist, finding some serious success and acclaim in the blues world.
 
“I’m tooting my horn,” Will says, “Shemekia Copeland’s album [which Will produced and played on] is up for Album of the Year and “Ain’t Got Time for Hate” [co-written by Will] is up for Song of the Year at the Blues Music Awards. I co-wrote the Song of the Year in Americana U.K. [“Southern Wind,” with Dean Owens], played on Blind Boys of Alabama sessions … That certainly sums up what I do, especially when combined with the release of the new solo record: artist, musician, producer, writer.” 
 
Believe it or not, he’s not bragging. He really does all those things and his part time gig is as Emmylou Harris’s guitarist and harmony singer — before that he was Rodney Crowell’s, and before that, Todd Snider’s. And damned if he didn’t go ahead and carve himself a successful solo-album career during all this other stuff that he was doing. With seven or eight or nine solo records and multiple releases as a member of Willie Sugarcapps and Daddy, Will’s career continues to grow. It is the little engine that will not rest.
Tommy Womack: Singer-songwriter, author, humorist and Kentucky native Tommy Womack got his start in 1985 to 1992 with legendary Bowling Green based post-punk and college radio faves, Government Cheese (who’s story is immortalized in Tommy’s cult classic book “Cheese Chronicles”). Upon moving to Nashville in 1992, Tommy’s become known for his long working relationship with Will Kimbrough, starting with their bands the bis-quits (who made one classic album for John Prine’s Oh Boy label in 1993), and their band Daddy, who have made two albums and enjoy a cult following.

Since 1998, Tommy has released seven solo albums, the latest being the brand-new “Namaste”. He looks forward to the back half of 2016 with new songs from that record to play, in addition to such proven past show-stoppers as “Nice Day”, “Vicky Smith Blues” and “Alpha Male & the Canine Mystery Blood.”

In addition to “Cheese Chronicles”, Tommy is the author of the comic Civil War novella “The Lavender Boys & Elsie”. He has written for many magazines, including the Oxford American, and is a regular contributor to The East Nashvillian. Tommy’s songs have been covered by Jimmy Buffett, Todd Snider, Jason and the Scorchers, the Del Lord’s Scott Kempner, Dan Baird & Homemade Sin, and others. He has lived in Nashville for 24 years, with his wife Beth and their son Nathan.